Lezione
Due
 

   PART 1 

David di Michelangelo       Miss Liberty

DIALOGO (Dialogue)

INFORMAL

 

David - Buongiorno. Io mi chiamo David. Come ti chiami tu?
Liberty - Io mi chiamo Liberty.
David - Tu sei italiana?
Liberty - No, non sono italiana, sono americana.
David - Tu sei famosa?
Liberty - Certamente. Io sono molto famosa.
David - Dove abiti tu?
Liberty - Abito a New York.
David - Dov'e' New York?
Liberty - New York e'  in America. E tu dove abiti?
David Abito a Firenze. Firenze e'   in Italia
Liberty - Dove lavori?
David - Lavoro in un museo.
Liberty -Di dove sei?
David -Sono di Firenze.

 

 

Miss Liberty   David di Michelangelo  


DIALOGO (Dialogue)

FORMAL

Liberty

- Buongiorno. Io mi chiamo Liberty. Come si chiama Lei?

David

- Io mi chiamo David.

Liberty

- Lei e' americano?

David

- No, non sono americano, sono italiano.

Liberty

- Lei e' famoso?

David

- Certamente. Io sono molto famoso.

Liberty

- Dove abita Lei?

David

- Abito a Firenze.

Liberty

- Firenze dov'e'?

David

- Firenze e'  in Italia. E Lei dove abita?

Liberty

- Abito a New York su un'isola. New York e' in America.

David

- Lei dove lavora?

Liberty

- Lavoro al Parco di Ellis Island.

David

-Di dove e' Lei ?

Liberty

-Sono di New York.


 


IN BOLDFACE THE FORMAL ADDRESS

 

 

Rewrite the Italian sentences in the spaces provided

Come ti chiami tu?
Come si chiama Lei?

What is your name?

Tu sei italiana?
Lei e' italiana?

Are you Italian?

 

No, io non sono italiana.
Io sono americana.

No, I am not Italian.
I am American.

 

Tu sei famosa?
Lei e' famosa?
 

Are you famous?

 

Certamente.
Io sono molto famosa.

Certainly.
I am very famous.

 

Dove abiti tu?
Dove abita Lei?

Where do you live?

 

Io abito a New York.

I live in New York.

 

Dov'e' New York?

Where is New York?

 

New York e' in America.

New York is in America.

 

E tu, dove abiti?
E Lei, dove abita?

And you, where do you live?

 

Io abito a Firenze.

I live in Florence.

 

Firenze e' in Italia.

Florence is in Italy.

 

Io lavoro in un museo.

I work in a museum.

 



Esercizio

TRANSLATE

 

What is your name?

 

Where do you live?

 

Where is Florence?

 

Where do you work?

 

Are you Italian (F)?  
Where is New York?  
Are you famous (F)?  


 

Esercizio:  

I am not Italian (F)

__________________________________

I am not italian (M)

__________________________________

I am very famous (M)

__________________________________

New York is in America

__________________________________

I am American (F)

__________________________________

My name is

__________________________________

I work in a museum

__________________________________

 

 

   PART 2 

CONJUGATING A VERB


When you conjugate a verb, each person ("I", "You" etc.) has a different ending .
Regular Verbs ,
such as ABITARE, LAVORARE and CHIAMARE follow a standard pattern.

All verbs ending in the infinitive with - ARE are conjugated following the same pattern.

ABITARE

"TO RESIDE, TO DWELL, TO LIVE"
 

 Io abit o ("I live")
Tu abit i ("You live" [sing])
Lui abit a  ("He lives")
Lei abit a ("She lives")
Noi abit iamo ("We live")
Voi abit ate ("You live" [plur])
Loro abit ano ("They live")

 

LAVORARE

"TO WORK"
 

io lavor  o ("I work")

Tu lavor  i

("You work" [sing])

Lui lavor  a

("He works")

Lei lavor  a

("She works" )
noi lavor  iamo ("we work")
voi  lavor  ate ("you work" [plur])
loro  lavor  ano ("they work")

 

 

CHIAMARSI

"TO CALL ONESELF, TO BE NAMED"
 

Io mi chiam  o ("My name is". Literally: "I call myself")
Tu ti chiam  i   ("Your name is". Lit.: "You call yourself" [sing])
Lui si chiam a ("His name is". Lit.: "He calls himself")
Lei si chiam  a ("Her name is")
Si chiam  a ("Its name is". Lit.: "It calls itself")
noi ci chiam  iamo ("Our name is". Literally: "we call ourselves")
voi vi chiam  ate ("your name is". Literally: "you call yourselves")
loro si chiam  ano ("their name is". Literally: "they call themselves")
   

CHIAMARSI is the "reflexive" form of CHIAMARE ("to call, to name"). We will talk about this form at lenght in a later lesson. (Click on the gears now for the corresponding grammar file.)

 

 

 

Verbs such as ESSERE and other irregular verbs have each a different conjugation pattern and must be memorized individually. (See "Appendix" for the complete tables.)

We will discuss this aspect in detail later
.

 

 

ESSERE

 

TO BE

 

Io sono

"I am"

Tu sei

"You are"

Lui

"He is"

Lei

"She is"

E'

"It is"

Noi  siamo

"We are"

Voi siete

"You are"

Loro sono

"They are"

REMEMBER:
IT IS
is simply
e'

IMPORTANT

Since each person has a different ending, the subject pronoun ("io," "tu," etc.) is understood and therefore can be left out. Thus, you will hear and read "abito" or "abiti" instead of the full form "io abito", "tu abiti". In other words, the use of the SUBJECT PRONOUN is OPTIONAL. As explained above, when we introduced the verb ESSERE, the subject pronoun for IT ("esso" and "essa") is practically always omitted.

 

   PART 3

informal and Formal

 

INFORMAL

FORMAL

 

 

 

To a man: 

"Tu sei italiano?"

"Lei e' italiano?"

 

 

 

To a woman:

"Tu sei italiana?"

"Lei e' italiana?"

 

 

The INFORMAL mode
is expressed with the pronoun
"TU"
("YOU" singular in English)
and the corresponding form of the verb

("sei").


The FORMAL mode
is expressed with the the feminine pronoun
"LEI"
(literally
"SHE" in English)
and the corresponding form of the verb

("e' ").



"LEI" thus means both "she" and "formal you".
To distinguish between the two
the INFORMAL is written with a small "l" (lei,)
while the FORMAL is written with a capital "L" (Lei).


 

   

per esempio (for instance)...

insult someone using
the following adjectives in whichever combination you want

brutto, cattivo, antipatico, stupido
 








 

INFORMALLY ("tu sei.."): FORMALLY ("Lei e'.."):

MASCHILE   

MASCHILE    

FEMMINILE  

FEMMINILE  

 

   PART 4 

 

Esercizio
Come si dice?

I am famous (M)

He is kind

You are American (F)

It is in Florence

She is Italian

He lives in Florence

He works in Italy

I live in America

You work in New York

She works in a museum

 

 

Translate

1. My name is

2. His name is

3. Your name is

4. Its name is

5. Her name is

6. Formal: "What is Your name?"


Che cosa vuol dire? (What does it mean?)
 

Lei abita a Firenze

Mi chiamo

Sei brava

Sono italiano

Lui si chiama

E'

Lavori a New York

Abito a Firenze

Lei lavora in un museo

 

THE NEGATIVE

The basic form of the negative is obtained by inserting the word "NON" in front of the verb

Io sono

Io non sono (I am not)
 

Io lavoro

Io non lavoro (I don't work)

 

   PART 5

ASKING A QUESTION

There are no rigid "grammar rules" to follow when it comes to asking a question. The crucial aspect is the intonation (or, if you are writing, the question mark "?")

You will hear and read:

Dove abiti? Tu dove abiti? Dove abiti tu?
Come ti chiami? Tu come ti chiami? Come ti chiami tu?
Sei italiana? Tu sei italiana? Sei italiana tu?


All these are perfectly "correct". The variations often reflect the particular emphasis of the question, as well as the context.

DOVE = Where COME = How
 

In front of " " ("is" ), usually the final "e" is dropped and an apostrophe
(the ' mark) is inserted. Thus, they become respectively:

Dov' and Com'



("WHERE IS..." "HOW IS...")

 

Write the questions

1. Abito a Firenze

2. Mi chiamo David

3. Lavoro a New York

4. No, non sono americano

5. No, non sono italiana

 

 

Come si dice? (How do you say?)

1. How is Florence?

2. Florence is beautiful

3. Where is Florence?

4. Florence is in Italy

5. Where is New York?

6. New York is in America


 

Q. "Come si dice famous?"

A. "Famous si dice famoso."

"Come si dice" means "How do you say"

 

ESPRESSIONI IDIOMATICHE
(Idiomatic expressions cannot be translated literaly)

Di dove sei? (Where are you from?)

Io sono italiano, sono di Firenze.

This is a very common expression. It normally elicits two types or answers:

1) if you want to tell the
city, the answer is "Sono di + Cityname."

2) if you want to indicate the country, you will use the adjective of nationality

   PART 6

PAROLE NUOVE

io abito..


 

casa

in una casa
(house)

La casa e' semplice
(simple, modest, ordinary)

 




castello

in un castello
(castle)

Il castello e' antico (ancient)
 

 


condominio

condominio

in un appartamento in un condominio
(apartment,
apartment building)

Il condominio e' elegante
(elegant, classy)

 




fattoria

in una fattoria
(farm)

La fattoria e' tradizionale
(tradit ional)

 


tenda

tenda

in una tenda
(tent)

La tenda e' piccola (small)

 




villa

in una villa
(villa)

La villa e' grande (big)

 


palazzo

palazzo

in un appartamento in un palazzo
(building, palace)

L'appartamento e' confortevole (comfortable)

Il palazzo e' centrale
(centrally located, lit.: central)

 


da sola, da solo
(by oneself)

Io amo il silenzio
(I love peace and quiet)

 


con un amico e un'amica
(with a male friend and a female friend)

Io sono socievole (sociable)
 

warning.gif (210 bytes)
condominio
means
"apartment building,"
not "condominium" ("condo.")

 
fattoria

means
"farm," not "factory.

 

Test your memory

Come si dice?

farm

castle

apartment building

house

apartment

building

 

Maschile/Femminile

Adjectives like

"buono," "italiano," "famoso"
when are associated with feminine nouns change the final vowel from
" - o " to " - a " ,
becoming "buona," "italiana," "famosa".

THESE ADJECTIVES belong to the "First class" of adjectives.

 

Other adjectives that end in " - e "
DO NOT CHANGE

whether associated with masculine or feminine nouns

.Example: "elegante," "grande," "tradizionale."

For the sake of classification, these are called "Second Class" adjectives.

 

Esercizio
 

un castello (ugly and old)

una ragazza (tall and elegant)

una casa (centrally located and comfortable)

una villa (simple and traditional)

un appartamento (small but [ma] classy)

 

Come si dice?
 

 

ordinary

comfortable

ancient

elegant

centrally located

traditional

sociable

 

Come si dice?

a modest apartment

a traditional castle

an ancient building

an old house

a comfortable farm

a sociable boy

a classy woman

a short man


 

Terzo grado ("Third Degree")

Parliamo di te (Let's talk about you)

Come ti chiami?

Tu sei italiano/italiana?

Tu lavori in un museo?

Tu abiti in un appartamento?

Tu abiti da solo/sola?



 

 

   Now you ask the questions (using the formal "Lei")

Mi chiamo Francesco.

Si, sono italiano.

Lavoro a casa.

No, non abito in un appartamento.

Si', abito in un palazzo centrale.

No, non abito da solo.

 

   PART 7 

 

Maschile/Femminile

Indefinite articles

UN

In front of  masculine nouns (see exception below)

UNA

In front of feminine nouns beginning with a consonant

 

but
 

UNA becomes UN'  in front of feminine nouns beginning with a vowel

 

exception


UN becomes UNO In front of masculine nouns beginning with S + consonant

 

UN

Appartamento, palazzo, condominio, castello, amico
are MASCULINE,


therefore the article will be in the corresponding masculine form
UN

 

UNA

Casa, villa, capanna, amica
are FEMININE.


The article for Feminine nouns is
UNA

 

UN'

However, in front of words that begins with a vowel, such as amica, the final "a" of the article is dropped and an apostrophe (the ' mark) inserted in its place. UNA AMICA, normally becomes  UN' AMICA

 

UNO

 in front of MASCULINE words that begins with

S + consonant (sc  st  sp )    Z

uno stadio, uno spazio, uno scorpione, uno zero, uno zaino

 

 

Articoli indefiniti
REWRITE THE WORDS PRECEDED BY THE CORRECT INDEFINITE ARTICLE

 

Casa

Amica

Americana

Italiano

Castello

Fattoria

Uomo

Appartamento

 

 

From masculine to feminine and viceversa and add the indefinite article

1. Donna simpatica

2. Ragazza italiana

3. Bambina bella

4. Amica americana

5. Uomo semplice

6. Donna tradizionale